Streets

Up until 1948, the center of the village of Albion consisted of only two streets, Main and School. Then, in an effort to attract more workers to the mill, the Berkshire Fine Spinning Associates built a housing development between Main and School Streets that added a new road to the village center. Although the mill owners had stated that additional housing developments could be built, an assessment by Howard H. Quinham, Lincoln zoning expert, in the September 23, 1948, edition of The Woonsocket Call, indicated in the words of reporter Normand Chamberland that “no great change is slated in its industrial, business or residential pattern.” Additionally, it was believed that “hardly any new homes will be built either…because of the large tract of land necessary to build on for sanitary conditions due to lack of sewers.”

What was not predicted was the conversion of the 200-acre Church Farm into a golf course and residential sites, the closing of the mill, and development of additional residential sites all the way to Mussey Brook. The map below shows the current street layout of the Albion district.

Current Albion street layout (www.mapgeo.com/LincolnRI/)

Current Albion street layout (www.mapgeo.com/LincolnRI/)

From the beginning of the Albion Company mill operations in 1822, the primary means to transport its goods was by teams of horses traversing two banks of hills through cartways and driftways to reach the East road (now Old River Road). The main east-west driftway from the mill to the East road is seen below above “ALBION” on the Walling map of 1851. It is the current School Street, and was often referred to as Lime Rock Road in the early 20th century. The several houses that can be seen on the map are located on a section of what is now Main Street. The mill was located at the eastern end of the driftway as it approached the Blackstone River. It is interesting to note that after the driftway crosses the railroad track, it turns northward and then circles back to the driftway, repassing over the canal at a point further north of the original crossing. The Newport Mercury reported on July 17, 1858, that the bridges at Albion village were to be replaced with new ones. From this map, it would appear that the bridges referred to are the two bridges that span the mill trench.

Walling map 1851

Section of Walling Map of 1851

 

 

With the acquisition of the Unity Manufacturing Company in Manville in 1854 by the Valley Falls Company, in which the principals of the Albion Company, namely Harvey and Samuel B. Chace, had a vested interest, it became imperative to seek a shorter and more rapid route between the two mills, which were both located on the Blackstone River. The two Companies acquired the land between the villages of Manville and Albion, and proposed the building of a road between the two villages to the Smithfield Town Council.

The proposed road was laid out on June 22, 1860, by W.G. Aldrich, surveyor. The original map of the surveyor’s road layout is located in the Central Falls City Clerk Office archives. The map has faded considerably, unfortunately affecting the quality of the copy below.

1860 Survey of the road from Albion to Manville

1860 Survey of the road from Albion to Manville

On January 13, 1904, Representative Gauvin of Lincoln met with the state commissioners of public roads and suggested that the road between Albion and Manville should be built by the commission. The road was said to be in poor shape, composed mostly of soft sand (Pawtucket Times, January 13 & 19, 1904). A special appropriation of $5,000 was approved. On May 16, 1904, members of the State Board of Public Roads inspected the road from Albion to the Woonsocket line, known as New River road, to estimate the probable cost of construction (Pawtucket Times, May 17, 1904). On September 6, 1905, the State Board of Public Roads awarded a contract to the town of Lincoln for continuation of the macadamized road built in 1904, the New River Road, for a distance of one mile from Manville to Albion (Pawtucket Times, September 7, 1905). It was to be a six-inch road of native stone and stop just north of Mussey Brook (Pawtucket Times, September 9, 1905). An inspector from the state board of highways visited the completed section of road on November 29, 1907, who found the road to be in fair condition. Places in the vicinity of Albion, however, needed repair to place the road in good condition for winter (Pawtucket Times, November 30, 1907). On October 17, 1912, the State Board of Public Roads awarded a contract to Oscar W. Rackle of Providence to continue the macadamization of the road for another mile towards Albion (Pawtucket Times, October 18, 1912). At the annual Lincoln town meeting held on June 9, 1913, William Erskine of the Valley Falls Company asked that an appropriation of $2,000 be authorized for adding extra width to the contracted road work, since the road at Albion was 30 feet wide in some places, while the contracted road was only 18 feet wide. Erskine added that the road was the main road for teaming from Woonsocket to Providence (Pawtucket Times, June 10, 1913).

The road between Albion and Manville, and including that portion of School Street from Main Street to the bridge over the Blackstone River, did not become part of the State highway system until the January 1913 session of the Rhode Island General Assembly, however. On March 24, 1916, Representative Albert Zurlinden introduced legislation seeking a $10,000 appropriation for the “construction” of said highway under the direction and supervision of the state board of public roads. Such funds would be available as required up to the limit of the approved appropriation (Pawtucket Times, March 25, 1916, page 5). The Times reported on August 18, 1917, that five cars of tar had arrived at the freight station for the state road.

In March 1918, washouts on the road caused by heavy rainstorms of the past winter were repaired by contractor T.J. Quinn. “Large gullies had been washed out on the sides of the roads, in some places to an extent of several feet, both in width and depth. Some of the washouts were such as to make traffic in the vicinity decidedly precarious, as there was danger of a machine or wagon tipping over if driven near the gullies” (Pawtucket Times, March 26, 1918). By 1919, the dirt roadbed was said to be in very poor condition for traffic. Although the road had been laid out and accepted in the highway system, it had not been officially “built,” meaning that little State money was appropriated for repairs. On February 14, 1919, Representative Albert Zurlinden of Manville introduced an act in the House to appropriate up to $35,000 for the construction of this road as a macadamized highway under the direction of the State Board of Public Roads. It was claimed that the “thoroughfare would be of great convenience to business houses of Providence that have occasion to transport goods to Albion and Manville” (Pawtucket Times, February 15, 1919, page 9). With federal aid appropriations available for state road work, it was reported by the Times on April 24, 1920, that work was underway on the road between Woonsocket and Albion.

On April 25, 1868, Mowry Lapham, William D. Aldrich, and John C. Mowry were appointed by the Town Council of Smithfield to survey, bound, and mark a highway from the East road to the village of Albion, in what would become School Street . The report was submitted on May 30, 1868 (Returns of Highways, May 29, 1847 to Sept. 10, 1886, pages 77-78). The report reads in part as follows:

“Whereas the Town Council of…Smithfield on the 25th day of April AD 1868 ordered that a highway should be laid out in the most convenient manner from the East or river road, to intersect with the terminus of a highway formerly laid out from the Village of Manville to Albion, the said Council…appoint…William D. Aldrich, John C. Mowry, and Mowry Lapham to survey, bound and mark out said highway, and to agree with the owners of the land through which said highway is to pass as to the damage if any which they may sustain by reason of said highway.

“These are therefore to authorize you [Aldrich, Mowry, & Lapham] …to proceed to about midway between the homes of Samuel Clark and Daniel Meader and to run Easterly following the road now travelled and to conclude at the Southerly end of the highway from Manville to Albion, and thence to survey bound and mark out said highway…”

The surveyors’ report was submitted on May 30, 1868, and reads in part as follows (Returns of Highways, May 29, 1847 to Sept. 10, 1886, pages 78-79):

“Said Highway is laid twenty-five feet in width to bound No. 17, at bound No. 18 said road is laid Thirty-Three feet in width, said Highway is laid on and adjoining the land of Samuel Clark, Michael Fahey, Thomas Grace, John Kough, Jr., Rice A. Brown, and the Albion Company and is bounded on the Southerly side of the same.

“The owners aforesaid claim no damage by reason of said Highway being laid as aforesaid…We have caused an exact draft or plan of said road to be made which accompanies this report and forms a part thereof…”

Unfortunately,the draft or plan referred to in the report was not located in the Central Falls City Clerk Office archives.

Not long after the Town Council had approved the road down to the village of Albion, it approved an extension of the road down to the Albion mill and to the newly built bridge over the Blackstone River. The Town Council meeting minutes for November 28, 1868, reads in part as follows (Returns of Highways, May 29, 1847 to Sept. 10, 1886, page 92):

“Whereas the Town Council of…Smithfield…ordered that a new highway should be laid out in the most convenient manner from the point the highway recently laid out and accepted meets the highway leading from the Village of Manville to the Village of Albion, in said town near the store in said Village (now occupied by Mason Freeman) thence running to the middle of the new bridge over the Blackstone River near said Village of Albion, the said Council…did…appoint…Rice A. Brown, William Duane Aldrich, and Samuel Clark to survey bound and mark out said highway, and to agree with the owners of the land through which said highway is to pass as to the damage if any which they may sustain by reason of said highway.”

The surveyors’ report was submitted on December 26, 1868, and reads in part as follows (Returns of Highways, May 29, 1847 to Sept. 10, 1886, page 94):

“Proceeded to a point next the intersection of the road leading from the Village of Albion to the Village of Manville, thence surveyed, bounded and marked out a highway to the middle of the blackstone river…commencing at a point in the Easterly line of the road leading from the Village of Albion to the Village of Manville … to the middle of the aforesaid Blackstone River. Said road is laid in the land of the Albion Company who in our opinion have sustained no injury by reason of said road being laid as aforesaid which is also conceded and agreed to by them, and attached to this report is a release from the aforesaid Albion Company whereby they have released and waived all claim to damage by reason aforesaid. Said road is laid 25 feet in width and is bounded on the Southerly side of the same. The annexed is an exact plan or draft of said road as surveyed, bounded and marked out by us…”

The Town Council accepted the report on the same day and ordered the highway to be built, “removing all impediments.” (Returns of Highways, May 29, 1847 to Sept. 10, 1886, page 95).

The referenced plan was located in the Central Falls City Clerk Office archive and is reproduced below.

1868 Survey of road from Albion village to the River

1868 Survey of road from Albion village to the River

While the draft or plan of the road section from the East road was not available, the compass measurements were included in the report to the Town Council. When combined with the measurements in the last report, a reasonable facsimile can be produced, and is presented below.

Reproduced plot of 1868 road surveys

Reproduced plot of 1868 road surveys

As late as August 1900, no official names for the streets had been established. The Pawtucket Times of December 14, 1898, reported that revised ordinances had been adopted by the Town Council, and that none of the members knew the name of the street that went past the St. Ambrose church. Some people in the village called it Limerock road and others Main Street. It was decided to call the name of the street “Main Street” in the ordinance. The matter was afterwards referred to the Highway Commissioner, Phillip Greene, to investigate and report back to the Town Council (Pawtucket Times, January 13, 1899). The matter was still under investigation in August 1900 when a committee was appointed by the town council to name the various unnamed streets and highways in the town (Pawtucket Times, August 30, 1900).

On August 17, 1899, a petition was submitted to the Lincoln Town Council for a sidewalk from the mill to the church, and from the residence of mill superintendent Waterman F. Brown “to the last mill house in the direction of Manville.” Still no street names! The petition was signed by Rev. Bernard of St. Ambrose, L.L. Mailhot, Arnold B. Chace, treasurer, Valley Falls Company, Waterman F. Brown, Charles C. Clark, Louisa E. Clark and others (Pawtucket Times, August 18, 1898).

The Pawtucket Times on March 4, 1901, reported that the condition of the roads in Albion was the worst in the memories of some of the older residents. The melting snow was like a stream flowing all over the roads. It was feared that another cold snap would result in very slippery and difficult travel conditions.

The Pawtucket Times on September 13, 1911, reported that 2,800 feet of gravel road had been made on School Street.

Frank Meader presented a petition to the Lincoln Town Council on September 11, 1912, signed by himself and 27 others requesting improvements to the highway leading from the Masonic Hall in Lime Rock to a point near the Contrexeville mill in Manville (i.e., Old River Road), and also to the road from the Clark place to Albion village (School Street). The Valley Falls Company was among the signers of the petition. The roads were described as being dangerous for travel (Pawtucket Times, September 12, 1912). Meader appeared before the town council on November 13, 1912, with regard to the condition of the highway from Albion Four Corners to Manville (i.e., Old River Road). No clear cut responsibility for that section of the road was indicated by the council. Meader offered to make the required repairs himself for $150, and he would guarantee the work (Pawtucket Times, November 14, 1912).

At the annual Lincoln town meeting held on June 9, 1913, council members and taxpayers took the current highway commissioners to task for failing to report the details of their expenditures. Some questioned whether the money spent matched the services received. The superintendent of the Valley Falls Company, William Erskine, for example, said that “he never saw any of the highway department at work in Albion. The Valley Falls Company, he said, cleaned the gutters and put in a culvert at a cost of about $80, and also repaired a bridge there on his orders.” Prescott W. Wilbur stated that $150 had been spent on the Albion hill, from the Four Corners toward the Clark place and in the other direction toward Fred Mann’s, and that the gutters in the village had been cleaned. L.L. Mailhot said that he often saw “Mr. St. Peter and Mr. Fay with carts in Albion. Mr. Wilbur said that Mr. St. Peter worked for him on the town. He did not know anything about Mr. Fay” (Pawtucket Times, June 10, 1913).

The Pawtucket Times reported on March 27, 1916, that workmen under the direction of Highway Supervisor Frank Meader were engaged in repairing the streets and gutters.

The Valley Falls Company called attention to the poor condition of streets and gutters in a letter to the Lincoln Town Council read at its meeting on November 4, 1916. The matter was referred to Councilman Mitchell of that district “with instructions to see that improvements were made at once.” As if to put proof to truth, a visitor from New Hampshire sprained his ankle on Main Street that same day, saying that “the local roads were about the worst he had ever encountered.” The Times reported on November 10, 1916, that “highway department men are engaged in repairing the streets and gutters of the village (Pawtucket Times, November 5, 1916, page 7).

Frank Meader appeared before the Lincoln Town Council on November 1, 1917, requesting improvements to the road from the Albion Four Corners to the line of the Providence and Burrillville street railway (Pawtucket Times, November 2, 1917).

In 1921, the Alphonse Yelle Post of the American Legion, located in Manville, requested the Lincoln Town Council to name several squares in Manville and one in Albion after soldiers who died during WWI. The request was approved, and the intersection of Main and School Streets was officially named Dionne Square in honor of the Dionne brothers. Previous to this, the Times had often referred to this area as “Market Square,” due no doubt to the presence of the local grocery store.

Also in 1901, the owners of the mills in Albion and Manville proposed the building of a new road between the two villages that would be laid out along the railroad tracks. Despite the existence of the road previously laid out between the two villages, much of the traffic between Albion and Manville passed over Mendon Road, which included the burden of climbing the steep hill in Manville and Cumberland (Pawtucket Times, May 8, 1901). The hill was considered a horse killer. In September 1901, the proposal was altered by the mill owners to have the road built on the eastern side of the Blackstone River in Cumberland, on land that the mills owned. The mill owners offered to pay half the cost of the new road (Pawtucket Times, September 9, 1901). The proposal was accepted by the Town of Cumberland in November 1901, and the town council authorized work to begin as soon as the funds from the mill owners was received. The mill owners quickly gave the town its share of the money, and the town proceeded to begin building the road on December 20, 1901. However, when the mill owners’ money had all but been spent, the work stopped. The mill owners petitioned the Cumberland town council in November 1902 to finish the road, whereby the the town council referred the matter to the highway committee, and also cited that no contract existed between the town and the mill owners for the building of the road (Pawtucket Times, November 21, 1902). On January 7, 1904, with work on the road still unfinished, the mill owners asked for their money back, threatening legal proceedings. The Cumberland town council referred the matter to the town solicitor for investigation and called for a special meeting on January 21 to consider the matter (Pawtucket Times, January 8, 1904). At the special meeting, former council members in attendance, including Andrew J. Currier, most recently a former manager of the Valley Falls Company and the Albion Company, agreed that no written agreement had been signed, although the taxpayers had agreed to an additional sum in the budget that was expected to be applied to the new road construction. Work was then suspended due to the cold weather, and an election brought in a new Democrat town council, whom it was alleged left the road unfinished. An argument was proffered that no timetable had been agreed for completion of the road, and so the Town could not be held liable (Pawtucket Times, January 22, 1904). The Cumberland town solicitor reported to the town council on February 4, 1904, that in his opinion the town of Cumberland was legally bound to build and complete the road. However, the town solicitor opined that the town did not appear to be guilty of intentional or unwarranted delay in performing the work required, and advised the council to deny the petition of the mill owners. He also advised that the town council request a special appropriation at the financial town meeting in June if funds could not be made available in the interim to complete the road (Pawtucket Times, February 5, 1904). Funds had not become available, and no further work was planned to be done on the road until after the taxpayers meeting in June. At this point in time, the road was considered to be half finished (Pawtucket Times, April 19, 1904). On May 18, 1904, the mill owners sued the Town of Cumberland for breach of promise for failure to complete the road (Pawtucket Times, May 19, 1904). Suits were later filed by the mill owners in the Common Pleas Division of the Supreme Court to not only reclaim the money invested, but also damages resulting from loss of interest on the money and lost appreciation of the land through which the road was to pass through (Pawtucket Times, September 3, 1904). The case was heard by the Supreme Court on December 29, 1904, and a decision was rendered in favor of the mill owners. The Valley Falls Company was awarded $1,180 and the Manville Company $3,540, all of which included interest and costs (Pawtucket Times, December 29, 1904). At a special meeting of the Cumberland town council on April 26, 1905, it was stated that the town council had promised to complete the road (Pawtucket Times, April 27, 1905). At a special meeting of the town council on May 11, 1905, a committee was appointed to complete the building of the road. On June 1, 1905, the town council ordered that the work begin at once, despite there being no appropriation for it (Pawtucket Times, June 2 & 3, 1905). At the annual taxpayers meeting, a proposal to appropriate $6,000 for completion of the road was approved (Pawtucket Times, June 14, 1905). On June 15, 1905, the newly elected town council voted to appoint its own committee to complete the highway (Pawtucket Times, June 15, 1905). The Pawtucket Times on October 3, 1905, reported that the construction of the road was progressing very favorably, due in no large measure to the recent stretch of fine weather. The road was expected to be completed within a few weeks (Pawtucket Times, October 24, 1905). However, the Pawtucket Times reported on November 16, 1905, that the laborers engaged in excavating had struck a rock, a surprise to the highway authorities. In addition, it was found that the appropriation for building the road had all been spent and work on completing the road would be suspended for the winter. The entire appropriation, it seems, was spent before any material progress had been made on the road. The Pawtucket Times reported on August 16, 1906, that the “Albion-Manville Road Has Been a Hoodoo.” It was said that in its present condition, there was not much of a road, that the road had been started “several times, and each time left in a condition little better than that when it was started.” It was referred to as “the greatest piece of municipal mismanagement in the history of the town.” On March 9, 1907, the Times reported that the Manville Company had offered to spend another $3,000 to have the road built in the Spring, which would leave the town of Cumberland with a share of about $1,900 or less. The Manville Company intended to contract the work out as soon as the ground had thawed (Pawtucket Times, March 12, 1907). However, by October 1907, nothing more had been done, and by April 1908, the Times was calling it “a derelict issue, floating unguided somewhere on the face of the political waters, with nobody anxious to attempt to steer the poor bark into port (Pawtucket Times, October 23, 1907 and April 4, 1908).

Up until 1823, when the textile mill was built, the only road in the village of Albion was a driftway that veered eastward from what is now Old River Road. It is not yet known whether the driftway extended to the Blackstone River, but after the mill was built near the river, it is certain that it did, since access to the driftway would have been necessary for the mill to ship and receive goods. The first tenements to be built by the mill owners were along the driftway. In time, another road was established that wended north and south from the driftway, a road that would become Main Street. The mill owners built more tenements, acquired more property, and moved buildings to create the village of Albion. The mill owners continued to be landlords until 1935, when a decision was made by the then current owners, Berkshire Fine Spinning Associates (BFSA), to sell all the tenement property.

A newspaper article on October 19, 1935, reported that 46 parcels were to be sold. Tenants were to be given first opportunity to purchase the buildings in which they lived. If they did not desire to buy after a specified time, the property would be offered at a general sale. Total value of the property was estimated at over $100,000. The baseball park was not included, nor was the supply of water and electric. The property was placed on sale on October 22, 1935.

According to an article by Norm Chamberland in The Woonsocket Call on August 24, 1964, each house bore a number “boldly printed on cardboard,” a number that would correspond with the numbers on what was known as the Kilburn Albion Plat prepared by the Waterman Engineering Co. in October 1935 (see below). On November 1, 1935, BFSA issued a quitclaim deed to the Kilburn Realty Corporation for nine parcels (Town of Lincoln Land Evidence 43, page 196). Parcel 1 included Lots 23 through 30; parcel 2 included Lots 31 through 34; parcel 3 included Lots 35 through 38; parcel 4 included Lots 39 through 46; parcel 5 included Lots 12 through 22; and parcel 6 included Lots 1 through 11. Parcel 7 included 22.565 acres south of Lots 35-46. Parcel 8 was a 20-foot strip near Lot D. Parcel 9 was unimproved land near the St. Ambrose cemetery. BFSA agreed to maintain the main lines of the sewer system for five years. Not included in the quitclaim deed were four properties identified on the plat map as Lots A, B, C, and D. These lots contained Firemen’s Hall, the boarding house, the fire station, and the convent for the nuns of the St. Ambrose parochial school. These lots, and other lots not specifically identified on the plat map, were later sold or transferred by BFSA acting on their own behalf. Further details of all these property transferrals will be discussed in the sections on each of the streets.

IMG_0809

Kilburn Albion Plat, October 1935

According to the Call article of August 24, 1964, Mitchell W. Arnold and F. Mitchell Smith, Jr., of the Henry W. Cooke Co. of Providence conducted the sale at the Firemen’s Hall. A buyer was expected to sign a sales agreement and make a deposit equivalent to 10 per cent of the value of the property. An additional 15 per cent was expected within 30 days, upon which there would be a final settlement and transfer of title. The balance could remain on mortgage at six per cent interest. Taxes for 1935 would be paid by BFSA. The valuation of the tenements ranged from $1,600 to $2,500, and the rent had ranged from $1.75 to $2.50 a week.

The following table lists all of the initial buyers of the 46 properties offered for sale, as listed in Town of Lincoln Land Evidence 43, the dates of the final settlements, and the current addresses of each property. Of the 46 properties listed, 40 were sold on the same day, November 20, 1935. Some buyers made multiple purchases. Chief among them were John W. Sherry and Harry J. Quinn,  superintendent and assistant superintendent, respectively, of the BFSA Albion textile mill, with seven purchases. Following them was Donat Guilbeault of Burrillville with five purchases, including the lot where the store was located (Lot 31). Another BFSA official who purchased property was John H. McMahon, president of BFSA. One of the stories that surfaced in the Boston Post of October 23, 1935, was that of Mrs. George Carr, the 90-year old widow of the former station master, who faced eviction from her home. An unidentified wealthy New York mill executive who Mrs. Carr had befriended as a youth stepped up and purchased a property where she could remain until the end of her days. The executive has never been named, but the list seems to narrow the choice to John H. McMahon, the BFSA President. There seems to be little other reason for McMahon to have purchased this property. Further evidence that Lot 35 is probably the property in question is supported by Chamberland in discussing where the Carrs lived, i.e., “a tenement in the first house on the west side of School street” (The Woonsocket Call, September 18, 1948). McMahon sold the property in 1939, most probably after Mrs. Carr had died.

List of Buyers

John H. McMahon also purchased on this day the property marked as Parcel 7 on the quitclaim deed to Kilburn Realty. This included 22.565 acres south of Lots 35-46 on the Kilburn Albion Plat.

 

Who were these buyers? The following attempts to define a little about each of the men and women who came forth to purchase these properties, as detailed in the Rhode Island State Census of 1935. Twenty-one of these buyers currently worked in a cotton mill, most probably the Albion mill. It is not known at this time whether any of the buyers had been living in the tenement or residence they had purchased.

Leo Bois was a native Rhode Islander born in 1891. He was married with five children. He worked as an overseer in a cotton mill.

Harry J. Quinn was the assistant superintendent of the Valley Falls Division of BFSA in Albion.

John W. Sherry was the  superintendent of the Valley Falls Division of BFSA in Albion.

Napoleon Robidoux was also a native Rhode Islander born in 1902. He was married and had no children living with him. He worked as a salesman in a grocery store. He was living in Manville at the time of the purchase, but had been recorded as living at 134 School Street in Albion in 1925.

Alida Desjardins was born in Canada in 1880 and had been naturalized. The census indicated that she was married and not employed.

Florence Bernier was born in Rhode Island in 1903. She was married and worked as a speeder tender in a cotton mill.

Donat N. Guilbeault was born in Rhode Island in 1900. He was married with three children, living in the Oakland section of Burrillville. He worked as a retail merchant in a grocery store.

Felix Moreau was born in Canada in 1889 and had not yet been naturalized. He was married with two children. He worked as a house painter.

Delphis Breault was born in Massachusetts in 1894. He was married with four children. He worked as a retail merchant in a variety store.

John Sovokoty was born in the Ukraine in 1910. He was married with three children. He worked as a milkman, and may have been living in Woonsocket at the time of the sale. He was naturalized.

Yvonne Simard was born in Canada in 1903. She was married and worked as a spinner in a cotton mill. She was registered as an alien.

Romeo Lacombe was born in Canada in 1901. He was married with one child. He worked as a foreman in a cotton mill. He was naturalized.

Joseph Lacroix was born in Rhode Island in 1895. He was married with seven children. He worked as a fireman in a cotton mill.

Pierre Lauzon was born in Canada in 1900. He was married with four children. He worked as a fireman in a cotton mill. He was registered as an alien.

Rosaire Descoteaux was born in Canada in 1906. He was single and worked as a farm laborer.

Florida Breault was born in Canada in 1893. She was married to Delphis Breault (see above) and was not employed. She was naturalized.

Joseph Boudreau was born in Canada in 1875. He was married with one child. He worked as a weaver in a cotton mill. He was naturalized.

Wilfred Gagne was born in Canada in 1887. He was married  and worked as a fireman and elevator operator in a cotton mill.He was registered as an alien.

Raoul Allard was born in Canada in 1906. He was married with four children. He worked as a weaver in a cotton mill. He was registered as an alien.

Napoleon Ducharme was born in Canada in 1873. He was married and worked as a weaver in a cotton mill. He was naturalized.

Gaudias Metivier was born in Canada in 1902. He was married with six children. He worked as a truck driver in a cotton mill. He was not yet naturalized.

Albert Lacombe was born in Canada in 1862. He was married and not employed. He was naturalized.

Telesphore Daneault was born in New Hampshire in 1899. He was married with six children. He worked as a laborer in a cotton mill.

Theophile Moreau was born in Canada in 1876. He was married with two children. He worked as an engineer in a cotton mill. He was naturalized.

John A. Blunt was born in Vermont in 1874. He was married with two children. He worked as a millwright in a cotton mill.

Celina Peltier was born in Massachusetts in 1896. She was married and worked as a drawing hand in a cotton mill.

Mederise Boudreau was born in Canada in 1902. She was married and worked as a spinner in a cotton mill. She was naturalized.

Aldor Boudreau was born in Rhode Island in 1902. He was married to Mederise Boudreau (see above) with one child. He worked as a speeder tender in a cotton mill.

Malvina Boudreau was born in Rhode Island in 1890. She was married and was not employed.

Joseph Thibeault was born in Canada in 1884. He was single and worked as a laborer in a cotton mill. He was naturalized.

Olivine Gagnon was born in Canada in 1870. She was widowed and not employed. She was registered as an alien.

Pierre Lacroix was born in Rhode Island in 1895. He was married with nine children. He was employed as an assistant overseer in a cotton mill.

 

BFSA added a new housing development to the village after World War II. With the development came new streets, namely Berkshire Drive, Willow Lane, and Ledge Way. Each of the primary streets in the village will be discussed in separate sections under this heading.

 

Sources: Genealogybank.com; Newport Mercury; Pawtucket Times; The Woonsocket Call; Returns of Highways, May 29, 1847 to Sept. 10, 1886Town of Lincoln Land Evidence 43

 

Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2015