World War I

WWI

On April 6, 1917, President Woodrow Wilson signed a proclamation formally declaring a state of war between the United States and Germany.

The village of Albion soon responded with a patriotic rally on April 23, 1917, held in the village square at the corner of Main and School Streets. The feature of the ceremony was the raising of a 70-foot pole hewed from two trees felled near the village and made into a flagpole at the expense of the residents, who generously contributed. As the Pawtucket Times reported on April 24, 1917, “at the top of the towering pole was a gilded globe surrounded by a number of electric bulbs, which, when lighted after darkness had closed in, showed colors of red, white and blue.” Former State Senator and current mill superintendent William H. Erskine presided over the ceremony, and “called upon all to be loyal to the government in the present crisis and do everything in their power to assist its every undertaking.”

Girls from the public school wore red, white and blue sashes, and the boys wore caps of the same colors. The children sang the national anthem after the flag was raised, accompanied by the Manville Brass Band. All in the crowd then recited the salute to the flag “with a will.” Speakers included William C. Bliss, commander of naval reserves, and Judge Frank Fitzsimmons, collector of the port of Providence. The ceremonies concluded with the singing of the “Battle Cry of Freedom” by the school children, and “America” by the hundreds gathered for the event. A brief concert by the band followed.

WWIOn May 2, 1917, a detachment of the Fifteenth Company of Pawtucket, Coast Artillery Corps, RI National Guard, established a guard post in Albion, relieving the Twelfth Company of Woonsocket. It appears that their primary duty was to guard the railroad bridge. On May 9th, a flag raising was held in the village square with 10 men of the Fifteenth Company in attendance under the leadership of Corporals Pruneau and McBrinn (Pawtucket Times, May 10, 1917, page 9). On June 29, 1917, the Times reported that all the Guardsmen of the Fifteenth Company had been ordered to report to the Dexter military training grounds in Providence on June 30th for drill duty preparatory to active service. The photo to the left may be some of those Guardsmen.

Not everyone in the State was inclined to support the declaration of war nor the proposed conscription. Socialists in Rhode Island joined in supporting the Socialist Party of America’s Saint Louis Resolution which condemned the combatant nations and urged Socialists and workers to refuse to aid the war, and also pledged its resistance to the draft.

Socialist Party Anti-Conscription Campaign

Socialist Party Anti-Conscription Campaign

As Joseph W. Sullivan stated in his article in Rhode Island History, Vol. 50, No.4, November 1992, titled ” ‘A Giant of Embodied Conscience’: Joseph M. Coldwell and the Socialist Party in Rhode Island,” an antiwar meeting in Providence was scheduled for May 20, 1917, but was prohibited by the Board of Police Commissioners. The scheduled speakers and other Socialist figures were warned that “any such disloyal rallies would result in their arrests.” One of these speakers, and an avid Socialist, was Edward M. Theinert of Albion, a farmer and activist not only for Socialist causes but also for new and improved methods of farming. He hosted many Socialist activities at his farm on Old River Road during WWI, including at least one semiannual meeting of the Socialist party of Rhode Island in August 1917 (Pawtucket Times, August 13, 1917), and another in September 1918 which was the subject of a Bureau of Investigation report dated September 8, 1918.

Sample WWI Draft Registration Card for June 5, 1917

On June 5, 1917, all male residents, alien as well as citizen, between the ages of 21 to 31, were required to fill out blank forms at the voting booths in their districts. Registrar for Albion, which was part of District 4, was Jacob Garber. Registrants received yellow slips acknowledging their registration.

 

 

According to available WWI Draft Registration Cards, 75 Albion men registered on June 5, 1917. Of these, 49 were employed by the Valley Falls Company.

Selected Draft Lottery numbers for District 4 began to be posted at the Lincoln Town House and later the Manville police station.

On June 11, 1917,  men and women volunteers made a house to house canvass mandated by the State of Rhode Island to enumerate every man over the age of 16 who had not registered for the draft and all women between the ages of 16 and 60. Among the volunteers in Albion were Viola J. Fanion, Henry Demuth, Mrs. Gilbert L. Church, Frank Erskine, Kathleen M. Galvin, and Alice Page (Pawtucket Times, June 9, 1917).

800px-U.S._draft_lottery

The first draft lottery was conducted on Friday, July 20, 1917.

The following initial accounting of the men whose lottery numbers were selected on July 20, 1917, is based entirely on postings in the Pawtucket Times. While the Times strived to be thorough in its listings for Pawtucket and Central Falls, it is questionable whether they were as thorough with the lists for District 4. A more accurate account is hoped to be attained in the future should the actual draft board records be located and researched.

The District 4 exemption board began examining men whose numbers were drawn for the first draft army on August 1, 1917. A quota of 52 men was required to be made available for service from the first draft. Some of these men were declared aliens, while others failed the physical exam. Some who passed the physical exam received exemptions based on support of their family or the need to retain their skills. By the third day, August 7th, 150 men had been examined, but only 13 had passed and were considered ready for formal drafting. None were from Albion. By this time, however, the quota had been raised to 82 men with an additional 10 percent of the whole to be held on a reserve list and 10 percent for any vacancies that may have occurred. A change to exemption rules issued on August 6th reduced the weight standard according to height and allowed men with teeth in poor condition to have them fixed before the formal draft (Pawtucket Times, August 7 & 9, 1917). These changes allowed previous men who had not passed the physical to be re-examined.

The following 33 men were reported to have been selected for physical examination at the local exemption board. The number in parentheses following each name refers to the lottery number assigned.

  • George Raoul Tessier (1324). He was born in New Hampshire in 1892 and worked as a weaver for the Valley Falls Company. He was discharged as physically unqualified on August 2, 1917 (Pawtucket Times, August 3, 1917).
  • Harry Joseph Hebert (1331). He was born in Canada in 1893 and worked as a “motor driver” in Providence. He was a naturalized citizen. He was declared not physically qualified when examined on August 2, 1917, falling below the minimum weight requirement. The change to exemption rules that were issued on August 6th reduced the weight standard, and Harry  was then declared eligible for the draft.
  • Joseph August Arthur Dionne (1323). He was born in Canada in 1891 and registered as an alien. He was an older brother to Alfred and Demetrius Dionne, of whom more will be spoken later. He worked as a speeder tender for the Valley Falls Company. He registered as an alien and the exemption board discharged him as an alien on August 3, 1917 (Pawtucket Times, August 4, 1917).
  • Frank Gagne (1322). He was born in Canada in 1893 and registered as an alien. He was unemployed at the time of registration.
  • Joseph Albert Frank Lacombe (1292). He was born in Canada in 1887, was naturalized, and worked as a spinner for the Valley Falls Company. He passed his physical exam on August 9, 1917, but filled an exemption based on being married with four children (Pawtucket Times, August 10, 1917). The exemption board granted the exception on August 15, 1917 (Pawtucket Times, August 16, 1917).
  • William Bonitz (1300). He was born in Massachusetts in 1893 and worked as a farmer for Frank Meader in Albion. He noted that he had four months service in the Massachusetts National Guard as a Private.
  • Oscar Arsene Champagne (1294). He was born in Natick, RI, in 1891 and worked as a loom fixer for the Valley Falls Company. He passed his physical exam on August 10, 1917, but filed an exemption based on being married with three children (Pawtucket Times, August 11, 1917). The exemption board granted the exemption on August 17, 1917 (Pawtucket Times, August 18, 1917).
  • Joseph Leon Chapdelaine (1354). He was born in Canada in 1889 and registered as an alien. He worked as a machinist in Pawtucket. He stated that he had served in the 54th Regiment for three years. The exemption board discharged him as an alien on August 10, 1917 (Pawtucket Times, August 11, 1917).
  • Edmour Joseph Brunelle (1288). He was born in 1896 in Canada, and was a naturalized citizen. He  was working as a registered druggist at Rousseau & Brown, Woonsocket, at the time of his registration.
  • Wilfred Riel (1314). He was born in Canada in 1886 and worked as a weaver for the Valley Falls Company. He registered as a declarant with the intention to be naturalized. He was an older brother to Joseph Albert (aka Philibert) Riel, of whom more will be said later. Wilfred was discharged by the exemption board as being physically deficient on August 15, 1917 (Pawtucket Times, August 16, 1917).
  • Lionel Rosaire Gagnon (1281). He was born in Albion in 1894 and worked as an operator for the Valley Falls Company. He was discharged as physically deficient by the exemption board on August 17, 1917 (Pawtucket Times, August 18, 1917).
  • Felix Moreau (1355). He was born in Canada in 1889 and worked as a paperhanger in Woonsocket. He registered as an alien. He passed his physical examination on August 17, 1917, but claimed an exemption based on being married with one child (Pawtucket Times, August 18, 1917). The exemption board granted the exemption on August 28, 1917 (Pawtucket Times, August 29, 1917).
  • Albert Dube (1346). He was born in Canada in 1893 and worked as a farmer for the Valley Falls Company. He registered as an alien. He was discharged as an alien by the exemption board on August 21, 1917 (Pawtucket Times, August 22, 1917).
  • Melbourne Henry Garber (1337). He was born in Albion in 1893 and worked as a shipping clerk for the Valley Falls Company. He passed his physical exam on August 22, 1917 (Pawtucket Times, August 23, 1917).
  • Elphage Francis Moreau 1339). He was born in Albion in 1894 and worked as a “back boy on spinner” for the Valley Falls Company. He passed his physical exam.
  • Isaac Patrick Blain 1284). He was born in Canada in 1891, and had declared his intention to be naturalized. He passed the physical exam but filed for an exemption based on his being married. He had been married for only four months when he registered in June 1917. He had been a chauffeur for Arnold Buffum Chace, treasurer of the Valley Falls Company.
  • John Dubiel (1347). He was born in Austria in 1896 and worked as a weaver for the Valley Falls Company. He registered as an alien. He was ordered to report to the exemption board for examination on August 23, 1917, but failed to appear (Pawtucket Times, September 25, 1917).
  • Joseph Albert Riel (1334). He was born in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, in 1891, and worked as a weaver for the Valley Falls Company. He passed his physical exam.
  • Walter Frederic Theinert (1352). He was born in Providence in 1895 and worked as a farmer on the farm of his father, Edward W. Theinert, in Albion. The registrar, Jacob W. Garber, noted that Walter’s parents “are owners of a big farm, & I do not see their dependence on him.” On February 4, 1918, the second district board denied Walter’s exemption claim and placed him in Class 1A, single man without dependent relatives (Pawtucket Times, February 5, 1918).
  • Joseph Delphis Breault (1333). He was born in Massachusetts in 1894 and worked as a weaver for the Valley Falls Company. On February 12, 1918, the second district board placed him in Class 4A, as a man whose wife is mainly dependent on his labor for support (Pawtucket Times, February 13, 1918). Some confusion exists as to his military status, however, since the Times had indicated that he had been serving with the Rhode Island National Guard at Fort Kearney, and reportedly was still stationed there when he returned to Albion on furlough in March 1918 (Pawtucket Times, January 29, & March 1, 1918).
  • Alphonse A. Paquin (1304). He was born in Canada in 1894 and had registered as an alien. On April 1, 1918, the second district board placed him in Class 4A, as a man whose wife is mainly dependent on his labor for support (Pawtucket Times, April 2, 1918).
  • Anthony Cruso (1356). He was born in France in 1888, was naturalized, and worked in the spinning room for the Valley Falls Company.
  • Osias Peter Degrand (1329). He was born in Albion in 1892 and worked as a bellboy in the Narragansett Hotel in Providence.
  • Henry Joseph Demuth, Jr. (1315). He was born in Albion in 1894, and was working as a storekeeper at the time of his registration in June 1917. The Times reported on June 11, 1918, however, that Henry was then working as a chauffeur for Arnold B. Chace, presumably as a replacement for Isaac Blaine, who had reported to Kelly Field in March 1918. Three days later, the Times reported that Henry had been included in the latest draft levy. However, the second district board at its June 22, 1918, meeting was reported to have reclassified Demuth in class 2, division D, as a necessary skilled industrial laborer in a necessary industrial enterprise (Pawtucket Times, June 22,1918). Yet, the Times reported on June 25, 1918, that Demuth had left that day for Camp Meade.
  • Joseph Alfred Dionne (1320). He was born in Canada in 1893 and registered for the draft as an alien. He worked as a comber tender for the Valley Falls Company.
  • Demetrus Dionne (1336). Brother of Alfred, he was born in Canada in 1895 and also registered for the draft as an alien. He worked as a speeder tender for the Valley Falls Company.
  • William Henry Erskine, Jr. (1299). He was born in Pawtucket in 1892 and worked as a mechanic in Woonsocket. He was the son of William H. Erskine, Superintendent at the Valley Falls Company mill in Albion.
  • Joseph Edmund Gagnon (1311). He was born in Canada in 1894 and worked as a mule spinner for the Valley Falls Company. He registered for the draft as an alien.
  • Jacob Winifred Garber (1283). He was born in Nova Scotia in 1895, identified himself as a native, and worked as a clerk in Pawtucket. He was a graduate of the 1909 class of the Albion public school, and of the 1912 class of Central Falls high school (Pawtucket Times, December 3, 1918). He acted as chief registrar for the June 1917 draft registration.
  • Joseph Arthur Goudreau (1338). He was born in Coventry, RI, in 1895 and worked as a mule spinner for the Valley Falls Company. He stated on his registration card that he had one leg that was partly disabled.
  • Delphis Thomas Lacombe (1291). He was born in Canada in 1893 and was a naturalized citizen. He worked as a fireman for the Valley Falls Company.
  • Thomas Arsene Lacombe (1298). Brother to Delphis, he was born in Canada in 1896 and was a naturalized citizen. He too worked as a fireman for the Valley Falls Company. Thomas showed his bravery early when on June 29, 1917, he climbed the flagpole in the village square to disentangle the flag which had been prevented from being hauled down for the evening (Pawtucket Times, June 30, 1917).
  • Jean Baptiste Lusignan, Jr (1313). He was born in Canada in 1886 and worked as a weaver for the Valley Falls Company. He had declared his intent to become naturalized.
  • Edmund Eugene Page (1327). He was born in Providence in 1891 and worked as a farmer on his father Fred’s farm in Albion.
  • Joseph Quinton (615). He was born in Massachusetts in 1888 and worked as a weaver for the Valley Falls Company. He was a stepbrother to Louis L. Lanctot of Albion. He registered in Central Falls, where he was living and working at the time. He was ordered to report for his physical examination on March 8, 1918 (Pawtucket Times, March 5, 1918).
  • Aristide J. Poissant (1307). He was born in Canada in 1890 and worked primarily as a weaver for the Valley Falls Company, but also as a barber. He registered for the draft as a declarant. The Times reported on June 14, 1918, that Poissant had been included in the latest draft levy. However, the second district board at its June 22, 1918, meeting was reported to have reclassified Poissant in class 2, division D, as a necessary skilled industrial laborer in a necessary industrial enterprise (Pawtucket Times, June 22,1918). Yet the Times reported on June 25, 1918, that Poissant had left that day for Camp Meade, MD. At its meeting on October 17, 1918, the second district board once again classified Poissant in class 2, division D, as reported in the Times of October 18, 1918.

On August 2, 1917, the Lincoln Town Council voted to canvass the town to identify all men who were enlisted in all branches of the US military and naval service. Frank Erskine was appointed to canvass Albion (Pawtucket Times, August 3, 1917, page 9). This action was reauthorized at a Council meeting in December 1917. The canvassing was expected to be completed by the end of January 1918, and a book prepared and preserved for future reference. An initial list was published in the Pawtucket Times on March 4, 1918.

The exemption board concluded the physical examinations on August 24, 1917, having achieved their quota. The board began selecting men for active service on September 5th, with the first Albion men, Harry Hebert and Joseph Albert Riel, being called up on September 18th. (Pawtucket Times, September 18, 1917). Both men reported to the exemption board in Centredale on that date, and to the state armory in Providence on the 19th, from where they proceeded to Camp Devens in Ayer, MA, for training (Pawtucket Times, September 13, 1917). They were both assigned to Company F, 301st Engineer Regiment (Pawtucket Times, September 21, 1917).

No Albion men were selected for the October 2, 1917, call-up (Pawtucket Times, October 3, 1917).

On November 14, 1917, a system of five classes was established into which draft registrants would be categorized. On January 3, 1918, it was announced that only registrants in Class I would be called up in the next increment. (Pawtucket Times, November 14, 1917, & January 4, 1918) Physical examination of these Class I registrants was ordered to begin on January 24, 1918 (Pawtucket Times, January 24, 1918).

On December 7, 1917, the United States declared war with Austria-Hungary (Pawtucket Times, December 8, 1917). Unlike the treatment of German aliens in the United States, who were labeled “enemy aliens,” Austrians in this country were not so labeled and were allowed to live, work, and travel anywhere. They were not allowed to enter or leave the country, however, without permission. This overall generous treatment of the Austrians was important to Blackstone Valley industries, as many Austrians were employed in the mills, including Albion.

War with Austria-Hungary

 

The last increment of the first draft was not to be called before February 15, 1918 (Pawtucket Times, December 28, 1917).

On a lighter side, Albion public school principal Anna I. Griffith found evidence in pupils’ textbooks in February 1918 that “the Kaiser is about as popular with the pupils as his Satanic Majesty, with whom his name is so frequently associated.” There was not one book in the whole school that contained a photo of the Kaiser in which that photo had not been defaced, mutilated, scratched out, or uncomplimentary words written in (Pawtucket Times, February 22, 1918). Textbooks in the Lincoln school system were thoroughly vetted in March 1918 to identify any material that expressed “German theories and German philosophy” with an aim to eliminate such textbooks. However, no such propaganda was discovered (Pawtucket Times, March 7, 1918).

The Times of February 25, 1918, reported that over 700 men from District 4 were listed in Class I. The exemption board sought more physicians to assist in conducting the physical exams.

New draft regulations that lowered the physical standards resulted in more men from the June 1917 registration receiving notices for physical exams in March 1918 (Pawtucket Times, February 1, 1918). The next draft increment was reported to be called after May 1, 1918 (Pawtucket Times, February 20, 1918), but in fact the last increment of the first draft and the beginning of the second draft began on March 29, 1918 (Pawtucket Times, March 29, 1918). The next increment began with the sending of orders to the local boards on April 15, 1918; these draftees were scheduled to be sent to Fort Slocum, NY, between May 1st and May 10th (Pawtucket Times, April 15, 1918). However, the next draftees from Albion, Osias Peter Degrand and Elphage Francis Moreau, reported to the Town Hall in Centredale on April 27, 1918, and they both left for Camp Dix, NJ, the next day. The Times reported on that day that a total of 827 Rhode Island men gathered at Union Station in Providence for the train trip to New Jersey. Thousands of people were said to have come to bid the new recruits farewell and to witness the mobilization. The constabulary band led the way to the station, where the troops clambered aboard their assigned cars. The special train arrived at Camp Dix at 7pm the same day (Pawtucket Times, April 23 & 29, May 4, 1918).

Thomas Arsene Lacombe left for Camp Dix, NJ, on May 17, 1918 (Pawtucket Times, May 16, 1918). He was then assigned to the 101st Engineers (Pawtucket Times, July 26, 1918).

Joseph Alfred Dionne, his brother Demetrus, and Joseph Quinton reported to the exemption board at Centredale on May 24, 1918, and departed for training to Camp Upton, NY, the next day (Pawtucket Times, May 17 & 25, 1918). The Dionnes were both assigned to the 314th Infantry, Company G (www.314th.org).

Joseph Arthur Goudreau was reported to be among the men leaving for training at Fort Slocum, NY, on May 25, 1918, but a subsequent item said that he left on June 2, 1918 (Pawtucket Times, May 25, 1918, & June 3, 1918).

 

Second drawing wwi

On June 5, 1918, all men who attained 21 years of age since the first registration on June 5, 1917, were required to register for the draft. Draft boards were expected to put at least 50 per cent of the registrants in Class I. Failure to achieve that figure would result in an investigation. Quarterly registrations were to be held subsequently. (Pawtucket Times, May 18 & July 27, 1918). In addition, every man of draft age was required to work or fight after July 1, 1918. Men who were identified as having non-useful occupations were to appear before their local board and given the choice of a new job or the Army. Some of the occupations considered non-useful were gamblers, fortune tellers, waiters, bartenders, theater ushers, elevator operators, and store clerks (Pawtucket Times, May 23, 1918). It was expected that these men would take useful jobs that would free up able-bodied men who could then be available for military service (Pawtucket Times, July 2, 1918). Community labor boards were to be established in the State for the purpose of raising quotas from non-essential industries (Pawtucket Times, August 1, 1918). A labor board was established for the district of Pawtucket, which included Pawtucket, Central Falls, Cumberland, and Lincoln (Pawtucket Times, August 9, 1918).

Only four Albion men registered for the June 5, 1918, draft. Three of the four worked for the Valley Falls Company. They were all selected on June 27, 1918, for the next draft levy (Pawtucket Times, June 27, 1918)

  • Amedee Richard (65). He was born in Canada in 1896 and worked for the Valley Falls Company. He registered for the draft as a declarant on May 29, 1918.
  • Arthur Bibeau (40). He was born in Canada in 1897 and worked for the Valley Falls Company. He registered as a declarant.
  • Albert Boucher (105). He was born in Massachusetts in 1897 and worked for the Valley Falls Company. He passed his physical shortly after registering and was expected to be sent to Fort Slocum for training (Pawtucket Times, June 7, 1918). The Times mistakenly called him “Arthur Bushee.”
  • Esdras J. Moreau (126). He was born in Albion in 1896 and worked in Woonsocket.

Under an “Albion” byline, the Times reported on June 13, 1918, that “about 60 local aliens went to the State House for registration this morning.”

The Times reported on June 14, 1918, that Henry Joseph Demuth, Jr. had been included in the latest draft levy. However, the second district board at its June 22, 1918, meeting was reported to have reclassified Demuth in class 2, division D, as a necessary skilled industrial laborer in a necessary industrial enterprise (Pawtucket Times, June 22 ,1918). Yet, the Times reported on June 25, 1918, that Demuth and Joseph Edmund Gagnon had left that day for Camp Meade.

Albert Boucher responded to a call from the Rhode Island State draft administrator for volunteers to help fill Rhode Island’s quota for the July 23, 1918, increment. Albert left for Camp Upton on July 23, 1918 (Pawtucket Times, July 13 & 17, 1918).

On August 24, 1918, all men who attained 21 years of age since the second registration on June 5, 1918, were required to register for the draft. This registration was seen as necessary to meet the draft calls in September. (Pawtucket Times, August 14, 1918) Only four Albion men registered for this draft call. Three of the four were Valley Falls Company employees. None were identified as having been selected for the next draft levy.

  • Aaron J. Mann (2498). He was born in Albion in 1895 and was working as an auto mechanic in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, at the time of his registration.
  • Joseph Etienne Daneault (228). He was born in Suncook, New Hampshire, in 1897, and worked for the Valley Falls Company.
  • Charles Homer Lamoureaux (222). He was born in Woonsocket, Rhode Island, and worked for the Valley Falls Company.
  • William Moreau (206). He was born in Albion, Rhode Island, and worked for the Valley Falls Company.

On September 12, 1918, all men between the ages of 18 and 45, except those who had previously registered or who were serving in the military, were required to register for the draft (Pawtucket Times, August 31, 1918). The public schoolhouse was used for the registration in Albion, under the supervision of Francis Erskine, Anna I. Griffiths, Viola Fanion, and Kathleen Galvin (Pawtucket Times, September 11& 12, 1918). Anyone not called for military service from this group was expected to seek and obtain work in essential production or work of recognized importance and value. Local draft boards were expected to act as judges of essentiality of the employment of each man whose name was on the registers of their area (Pawtucket Times, September 23, 1918). Any man refusing to seek and obtain such work was to be considered a “slacker.” It was expected that women would take over the non-essential jobs that the men left behind (Pawtucket Times, September 25, 1918).

Some 69 Albion men registered for the September 1918 draft call. The Valley Falls Company employed 55 of them.

The 18-45 draft lottery was held from September 30 to October 1, 1918. The following 22 men were reported to have been selected for physical examination at the local exemption board:

  • Omer Joseph Lacroix (625). He was born in 1899 and worked as a mule spinner for the Valley Falls Company. (Pawtucket Times, September 30, October 1 & 25, 1918).
  • Delphis Adelard Gagne (623). He was born in Canada in 1898 and worked as a mill hand for the Valley Falls Company. He registered as a declarant. (Pawtucket Times, October 25, 1918)
  • Joseph Albani Poissant (1507). He was born in Canada in 1873 and worked as a saloon keeper in Albion. He registered as a naturalized citizen. (Pawtucket Times, October 26, 1918)
  • Archie Moreau (2524). He was born in Albion in 1885 and worked as a clerk in Pawtucket for the New York New Haven & Hartford Railroad Company. (Pawtucket Times, October 28, 1918)
  • Alfred Lebeau (1775). He was born in 1878 and worked overhauling machinery at the Valley Falls Company. (Pawtucket Times, October 28, 1918)
  • Mikalof Charkas (2529). He was born in Austria in 1880 and worked as a mill hand for the Valley Falls Company. He registered as an alien. (Pawtucket Times, October 28, 1918)
  • Michael Dubois Quentin (1021). He was born in 1878 and worked as a weaver for the Valley Falls Company. He was a brother of Joseph Quinton. (Pawtucket Times, October 28, 1918),
  • Zenon Joseph Louis Trudel (2468). He was born in Canada in 1881 and worked as a loom fixer for the Valley Falls Company. He registered as a declarant, and was noted as having a deformed finger. (Pawtucket Times, October 29, 1918)
  • Elzeard Lemieux (429). He was born in Canada in 1875 and worked as a weaver for the Valley Falls Company. He registered as a declarant. He was reported to have lost one eye and to have a stubbed finger. (Pawtucket Times, October 30, 1918)
  • Fabien Lemieux (3180). He was born in Canada in 1886 and worked as a weaver for the Valley Falls Company. He registered as a declarant. (Pawtucket Times, October 30, 1918)
  • Arthur Amedee Gagne (626). He was born in Canada in 1900 and worked as a doffer for the Valley Falls Company. He registered as a declarant. (Pawtucket Times, October 31, 1918)
  • Alec Gendron (2438). He was born in Canada in 1873 and worked as a weaver for the Valley Falls Company. He registered as an alien. (Pawtucket Times, October 30, 1918)
  • Peter Lanovy (424). He was born in Austria in 1881 and worked as a mill hand for the Valley Falls Company. He registered as a declarant. (Pawtucket Times, November 1, 1918)
  • Sylvester Stroka (432). He was born in Austria in 1876 and worked as a mill hand for the Valley Falls Company. He registered as an alien. (Pawtucket Times, November 1, 1918)
  • Joseph Turgeon (2281). He was born in Canada in 1881 and worked as a machinist for the Valley Falls Company. He registered as a declarant. (Pawtucket Times, November 2, 1918)
  • Leon Joseph Couture (2526). He was born in Canada in 1886 and worked as a mill hand for the Valley Falls Company. He registered as a naturalized citizen. (Pawtucket Times, November 2, 1918)
  • Thomas James Clement (2547). He was born in 1885 and worked as a mill hand for the Valley Falls Company. (Pawtucket Times, November 4, 1918)
  • Benjamin Ballou Newman (2159). He was born in 1875 and worked as a farmer on his own land in Albion. (Pawtucket Times, November 4, 1918)
  • Pierre Couture (1855). He was born in Canada in 1878 and worked as a section hand for the Valley Falls Company. He registered as a naturalized citizen, and was noted as having a missing thumb. The Times identified him as “Goutine,” but the lottery number listed was that of Mr. Couture (Pawtucket Times, November 7, 1918).
  • Joseph Boudreau (420). He was born in Canada in 1876 and worked as a weaver for the Valley Falls Company. He registered as a declarant. (Pawtucket Times, November 7, 1918)
  • William Richard Burke (47). He was born in 1878 and worked as a weaver for the Valley Falls Company. (Pawtucket Times, November 7, 1918)
  • Gilbert Leighton Church, Jr. (126). He was born in 1879 and worked as a credit manager & assistant treasurer at Brown & Sharpe, Providence. He was noted as having a short leg. (Pawtucket Times, November 11, 1918).

The entrainment of the September 1918 draftees scheduled between October 7 and 13 was canceled due to the influenza epidemic prevalent in many army camps. It was not expected that entrainment would commence until the epidemic had been checked (Pawtucket Times, September 27, 1918). Examination of new registrants in Rhode Island had also been delayed by the epidemic, but were ordered resumed on October 29, 1918 (Pawtucket Times, October 29, 1918), and were expected to be undertaken with “the utmost rapidity in order that a sufficient number of men … be qualified not later than Nov. 8” (Pawtucket Times, October 30, 1918). However, none of the 22 Albion men from the 18-45 list were selected for the ensuing draft levy.

 

NOVEMBER 11, 1918 – ARMISTICE DAY

Nov 11

With the signing of the armistice on November 11, 1918, President Wilson canceled the army draft calls. All men who had been called but had not completed their training were to be immediately turned back to civilian life. Draft boards were to complete the classification of the 18-45 men, however. (Pawtucket Times, November 11, 1918) This was changed the next day to limit the classification to those men between 19 and 36 years of age (Pawtucket Times, November 12, 1918).

Secretary of the Navy Daniels announced on December 5, 1918, that he had authorized men who had enlisted in the Navy for the War and who did not intend “to follow the sea” to be released as quickly as possible to permit them to return to civil pursuits (Pawtucket Times, December 5, 1918)

As part of a nationwide effort, the Town of Lincoln in March 1919 began registering returned soldiers and sailors of the town who were discharged from service. Registration was not compulsory, but it was strongly recommended (Pawtucket Times, March 27, 1919). As of April 4, 1919, the following Albion men had been registered, according to the Times:

•Jacob W. Garber, 103rd Field Artillery
•Eugene A. Phillips, 103rd Field Artillery

In 1921, the Alphonse Yelle Post of the American Legion asked permission from the Lincoln Town Council to name a number of squares in Manville and Albion after soldiers who had died in the service of their country during WWI. The junction of Main Street and School Street in Albion was named Dionne Square, in honor of Alfred and Demetrus Dionne.

In 1925, a monument was erected on the lower portion of School Street in Albion, behind the boarding house, by the Cercle Jacques Cartier dedicated to the men of Albion who served in WWI. The granite statue is said to have been created in the likeness of one of the Dionne brothers who died in the war. (NOTE: Click on each thumbnail to enlarge the photo).

Dedication of WWI Monument

Dedication of WWI Monument

WWI Monument

WWI Monument

(Personal photo)

(Personal photo)

 

 

 

 

 

The names of the 41 men who served in the war are inscribed on the monument. Some of the names are not correct, and I suspect that at least one name may be missing.

 

(Personal photo)

(Personal photo)

(Personal photo)

(Personal photo)

(Personal photo)

(Personal photo)

 

 

 

 

 

The following men are the heroes who were honored. Details for some are sketchy or nonexistent, and further information is kindly requested from anyone who may have such knowledge.

Charles J. Blain. He was born in 1882. Blain had received a commission from the government as a letter censor in France (Pawtucket Times, March 12, 1918). The Times of July 26, 1918, reported that Blain had been honorably discharged and was on his way home at that time.

Isaac Patrick Blain. It is likely that he enlisted between March 4 and March 15, 1918, in response to an immediate call for chauffeurs who would be sent to Kelly Field, Texas, where he was later reported to have been stationed (Pawtucket Times, March 4, 1918, & August 6, 1918). This appears to be borne out by the fact that Rhode Island met its quota of 25 chauffeurs (Pawtucket Times, March 9, 1918). The chauffeurs boarded a special train and left for Kelly Field from Union Station in Providence on March 19, 1918, transferring to another special train in Washington, DC (Pawtucket Times, March 14, 1918). Corporal Blain was reported to be visiting his mother in Albion in early November 1918 (Pawtucket Times, November 2, 1918).

Edmour Joseph Brunelle. He enlisted and was initially assigned to the druggist laboratory at Fort Adams (Pawtucket Times, July 10, 1917). The Pawtucket Times on January 1, 1918, reported that he was currently stationed at Camp Meade in Washington, DC.

Ernest Buffum.

Albert Boucher.

Antonio Cruso. He signed his name as “Anthony.” A man named Anthony Cruso was reported to have enlisted in the US Navy on October 12, 1917, and was assigned to Norfolk, VA, as a fireman third class. He was reported to be from Lonsdale, however (Pawtucket Times, October 13, 1917). Another man named Anthony Cruso, also with a Lonsdale address, was reported to have been among the drafted men who went to Camp Upton on August 27, 1918 (Pawtucket Times, August 27, 1918). A thorough search of the WWI Draft Registration Card database includes only one Anthony Cruso, the man who registered from Albion.

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Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery Scroll

Alfred & Demetrus Dionne

Alfred & Demetrus Dionne

Joseph Alfred Dionne. He served with the 314th Infantry, Company G (www.314th.org). Alfred died on November 10, 1918, and was buried in the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery in France.

Demetrus Dionne. He served with the 314th Infantry, Company G (www.314th.org). Demetrus died on September 28, 1918, of wounds received (Boston Herald, December 18, 1918),  and was also buried in the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery in France.

NOTE: Joseph August Arthur Dionne, brother of Alfred and Demetrus Dionne, also registered for the draft as an alien. He too was among the first group of men to have his lottery number called. He was disqualified as an alien, while his slightly younger brothers were not (Pawtucket Times, August 4, 1917). At the time that Alfred and Demetrus were examined, however, the rules had changed to allow an alien to be drafted if he did not ask for an exemption. Perhaps that is what happened in their situation. In the late 1920s, as part of a nationwide effort by the War Department, Mrs. Octave Dionne, mother of the Dionne brothers, was offered to take part in a pilgrimage to her sons’ burial ground in France. She declined the offer (ancestry.com, “U.S. World War I Mothers’ Pilgrimage, 1930” database).

Henry Joseph Demuth, Jr. The Times reported on June 14, 1918, that Henry had been included in the latest draft levy. However, the second district board at its June 22, 1918, meeting was reported to have reclassified Demuth in class 2, division D, as a necessary skilled industrial laborer in a necessary industrial enterprise (Pawtucket Times, June 22 ,1918). Yet, the Times reported on June 25, 1918, that Demuth had left that day for Camp Meade.

Osias Peter Degrand. He reported to the Town Hall in Centredale, RI, on April 27, 1918, along with Elphage Moreau. Peter left for Camp Dix, NJ, the next day (Pawtucket Times, May 4, 1918). He was reported to have been gassed while fighting in France (Pawtucket Times, November 30, 1918). The Summary of Casualties to Date posted in the Times on December 18, 1918, and the Boston Herald of the same date listed him as being among the severely wounded.

Joseph Aime Dufault.

William Henry Erskine, Jr. He enlisted in the 15th Company of the Rhode Island National Guard and was stationed at Springfield, MA (Pawtucket Times, September 29 & October 23, 1917). Erskine took part in the Company’s celebration of the completion of a full year in federal service by giving a toast in verse to Commanding Officer Captain Henry E. Connors, “which received much applause” (Pawtucket Times, February 25, 1918). The Times reported on May 24, 1918, that he had been operated on while at Springfield. He transferred with his Company to Fort Greble in June 1918 (Pawtucket Times, June 13, 1918). He was later assigned to Fort Kearney (Pawtucket Times, August 6, 1918).

Joseph Arthur Goudreau. The Times of August 7, 1918, indicated that he was at Fort Slocum, where he was visited by his father, Jeremiah, and Ralph Capron. The Times of August 24, 1918, reported that Arthur’s father had received a letter that his son was in France at that date. On October 19, 1918, the Times reported that Goudreau wrote that he was well and “located in a village where the Germans have broken up every home.”

Courtesy Robert Lacroix

Joseph Gagnon (Photo courtesy of Robert Lacroix)

Joseph Edmund Gagnon. He was born in Canada in 1894 and worked as a mule spinner for the Valley Falls Company. He had registered as an alien.

 

 

 

 

Courtesy Robert Lacroix

Philip Gagnon (photo courtesy of Robert Lacroix)

Philippe Gagnon. Brother to Joseph, he was born in Canada in 1898 and worked as a spinner in the cotton mill.

 

 

 

 

Angus G. Garber. He was with the Medical Corps (Pawtucket Times, April 1, 1918). He was appointed first class sergeant at Camp Meade with the University of Maryland unit in April 1918 (Pawtucket Times, April 19, 1918). The Times of August 5, 1918, reported that he had arrived in England. He soon was promoted to Sergeant-Major (Pawtucket Times, August 17, 1918). He served with Base Hospital No. 42 in France (Pawtucket Times, December 3, 1918).

Jacob W. Garber

Jacob W. Garber

Jacob Winifred Garber. Brother to Angus Garber, Jacob enlisted in the Rhode Island Coast Artillery (R.I.C.A.) on July 5, 1917, and remained in training at the State Armory for a few weeks. He was initially attached to the 20th Company, R.I.C.A. As a corporal on August 3, 1917, he reported to Fort Standish in Boston harbor (Pawtucket Times, August 3, 1917). The 20th Company was subsequently transferred to the 102d Massachusetts Regiment, Field Artillery, at Boxford (Pawtucket Times, August 27, 1917). He departed for France on September 23, 1917. Garber wrote to his mother, Mrs. Henry W. Garber, and to his sister Beatrice, who frequently shared their letters with the Pawtucket Times. In a letter that appeared in the October 29, 1917, edition, Garber, who was in France with the Fifty-first Brigade, wrote: “Arrived here O.K.; everything is going smoothly; am getting plenty to eat, and for the present all is well and no cause for worry. Be sure and write me.” In a letter published in the Times on May 2, 1918, Garber wrote that his Division “has been in action for some time, and we have had a taste of real war… While we were in the church [for Easter services] a German airplane flew over and dropped a few bombs, one of which struck the vestry of the church, but the service continued nevertheless. With guns outside blazing away at the Hun plane, we were greatly impressed. Slept part of that night with our gas masks on for fear of asphyxiation.”  Soon after she received his letter, Mrs. Garber hung a service flag from her house on School Street, the first such flag in the village (Pawtucket Times, November 6, 1917).

Blue Star Service Flag

Blue Star Service Flag

In his letter to Beatrice published on December 31, 1917, Garber wrote:

“…the people are miserably poor. The soldiers, for instance, wear all manner of uniforms, blue, gray, red and even green and white trousers. They are so poor that they wear anything that can be secured….One thing particularly noticeable is the absence of young men; in fact, all men from the towns. No one there but old women and children. Almost all the women wear mourning, and women conductors, letter carriers, etc., are common… I came over on the Finland and the Antilles. Phillips [Eugene Phillips] came over on the Baltic. In our convoy there were three transports, the Finland, Antilles and Henderson. Of these the Finland and the Antilles have since been torpedoed…”

The brigade moved to the front line in February 1918. Garber volunteered for the tank corps soon afterwards.

In part of a letter printed in the Times on August 17, 1918, Garber wrote that he had “joined the tanks outfit and like it O.K. We are beginning to round out into professional Hun-getters and we’ll chase them to the Rhine, if not further.” Garber had also been appointed chief instructor of the pistol ranges for his battalion.

Garber was wounded and gassed in the American drive that wiped out the St. Mihiel salient in the German Line. He was hit by a fragment of explosive shell, which penetrated his right leg above the knee (Pawtucket Times, December 3, 1918). Upon his discharge, he was identified as being with the 103rd Field Artillery.

Jean G. Guay.

Francis A. Guay.

Ulric Grenon. He was born in Manville in 1887, lived in Woonsocket, and worked as a wine clerk in his father Joseph’s saloon in Albion. He noted on his draft registration card that he had had a compound fracture to one arm in 1916.

Harry Joseph Hebert (inscribed as Henri Hebert on the monument). Hebert wrote from France, as reported in the Pawtucket Times on April 5, 1918, that he was “in fine condition and is enjoying life.” In France at Brigade Headquarters, 51st Brigade, Hebert wrote to Francis Erskine, in excerpts published in the Times on May 11, 1918, that he had arrived in France safely “after a long voyage of seasickness. We did not have any opportunity to get into close quarters with a sub but nevertheless we were well prepared for them…I saw Charles Blain, who came over on the same boat and that was some surprise to me.”

An account of the Regiments history can be read in Houghton Mifflin Company’s The Three Hundred and First Engineers: A History, 1917-1919, with illustrations, available to read online at Open Library. A more specific account of Company F’s experience can be read online at the Hathi Trust Digital Library, Company F, Three Hundred and First Engineers.

Normand Handerson.

Thomas & Delphis Lacombe

Thomas & Delphis Lacombe

Delphis Thomas Lacombe. He enlisted with the 22nd Company, 103rd Engineers Corps, and was stationed at Fort Kearney (Pawtucket Times, November 1, 1917). He was based in Washington, DC, in December 1917, when he was visited by his brothers Joseph and Ludger (Pawtucket Times, December 11, 1917). Serving in France in January 1918, he wrote to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Lacombe, that “he is in fine condition and enjoying life.” (Pawtucket Times, January 28, 1918)

Thomas Arsene Lacombe. He served with the 101st Engineers (Pawtucket Times, July 26, 1918). He was reported to have received the Croix de Guerre (Pawtucket Times, December 6, 1919).

Jean Baptiste Lusignan, Jr. He was born in St. Damase, Quebec, Canada in 1886 and worked as a weaver for the Valley Falls Company. He had declared his intent to become naturalized. He enlisted with the 12th Company and was stationed at Fort Kearney (Pawtucket Times, November 20, 1917). The Times of August 6, 1918, reported him as having arrived overseas. He served with Battery F, 44th Artillery (C.A.C.). He departed Brest, France, for the US aboard the transport ship RMS CEDRIC on January 26, 1919.

Courtesy Robert Lacroix

Louis Lanctot (photo courtesy of Robert Lacroix)

Louis L. Lanctot. He was born in Manville, RI, in 1896. He served with the 321st Battalion and saw action in France.

 

 

 

 

Robert Letourneau.

William H. Lund. He was born in Grafton, MA on December 18, 1900. He enlisted in the US Navy on August 12, 1918 and was released on October 9, 1919.

Joseph W. Ledoux.

Joseph E. Metivier. He was born in Canada in 1896. He enlisted with the 12th Company, C.A.N.B., Rhode Island National Guard, and was was stationed at Fort Kearney  (Pawtucket Times, June 8, 1918).

Esdras J. Moreau.

Albert N. Moreau. Brother to Esdras, he was born in Albion in 1898.

Elphage Francis Moreau. On January 9, 1918, Elphage was notified of his IA status for military service [i.e., single man without dependent relatives], and he was declared qualified to serve on January 24th by the local board. He received an Order of Induction dated April 15, 1918. He served in the U.S. Army as a Private in Company F, 147th Infantry, 37th Division, 74th Brigade. He was in France from July 23, 1918, to January 19, 1919, and took part in the Meuse-Argonne offensive, the final offensive of World War I. He was poisoned in a mustard gas attack and suffered from shell shock, but his discharge document did not acknowledge any wounds. He was awarded the Verdun medal for his service in the Verdun sector and the World War I Victory MedalHe was discharged from the U.S. Army on January 30, 1919, at Camp Upton, Long Island, NY.

Thomas F. McCabe.

Edmund Eugene Page.

USS NEVADA

USS NEVADA

Leon Allen Page. Brother to Edmund, he was born in 1894 and also worked as a farmer on his father Fred’s farm in Albion. He was a midshipman on the USS NEVADA (BB-36) (Pawtucket Times, September 15, 1917). He was later reported to have been assigned to the destroyer JENNINGS (Pawtucket Times, August 14, 1918), but no ship by that name can be located.

USS MINNESOTA

USS MINNESOTA

Frederick Lloyd Page. Brother to Edmund and Leon, he was born in 1899 and also worked as a farmer on his father Fred’s farm in Albion. He was too young to register for the draft in either 1917 or 1918. He was able to enlist in the U.S. Navy, however, and he was reported to be a midshipman on the battleship USS MINNESOTA (BB-22) in January 1918 (Pawtucket Times, January 1, 1918), which ship had been assigned as a gunnery and engineering training ship, cruising off the middle Atlantic seaboard.

Pacifique Poissant grave marker

Pacifique Poissant grave marker

Pacifique Poissant. He was born in Canada in 1885. He enlisted in the Rhode Island National Guard on April 3, 1917, and was assigned to the 12th Company (Pawtucket Times, July 9, 1917). He was stationed at Fort Kearney and at Fort Greble, and was assigned to Company B, 1st Division, Bn 151st Depot Brigade. He was honorably discharged on November 29, 1918.

Eugene A. Phillips. He was born in New York in 1894 and had worked as a laborer in the cotton mill. He enlisted in Battery A, Rhode Island Field Artillery, National Guard, at Quonset Point, RI (Pawtucket Times, August 13 & October 23, 1917). Battery A had been mobilized for Federal service on July 25, 1917, and had transferred to Quonset Point for training the next day. It was drafted into the U.S. Army on August 5, 1917. The Battery soon transferred to Boxford, MA, where the Battery became part of the 103rd Regiment, in the 51st Field Artillery Brigade, 26th “Yankee” Division.

Transport ship BALTIC (from Old Ship Picture Galleries)

Transport ship BALTIC (from Old Ship Picture Galleries)

Battery A sailed with the Regiment out of New York on October 9, 1917, aboard the White Star liner, now troop transport, BALTIC.  The ship sailed to Halifax, Nova Scotia, and joined a convoy for the trip to Liverpool, England. One of Phillips’ fellow soldiers wrote about the Battery’s crossing to England, describing the voyage as generally smooth sailing with relatively few men suffering from seasickness. The ship docked in Liverpool on October 22nd, and on October 23rd Battery A boarded a train to Southampton, whence they marched to a rest camp, arriving on the 24th. It was said that “Evidently one isn’t supposed to eat here, just rest,” after being served a “meagre” breakfast of bread and tea (Pawtucket Times, November 20, 1917). According to a letter from another soldier in Battery A, the stay in Southampton was for only a few days, whence they shipped off to France (Pawtucket Times, December 22, 1917). In fact, Battery A boarded the ship VIPER on October 29th and arrived at Le Havre the next day. A march and a train ride later, Battery A arrived at Camp Coëtquidan, where they would spend the next three months learning to handle the Schneider 155mm Howitzer.

103rd Field Artillery Regiment

103rd Field Artillery Regiment

The Times printed a letter on May 7, 1918, that Phillips sent to his mother. In the letter, Phillips said “We have been on the road for two weeks going from one place to another, staying at different villages over night, sleeping in barns and some times pitching tents. Now we are stationed in a small place, living in a monastery which was built in the year 1140. It is very interesting to see so much of the country, such beautiful landscapes and ancient buildings.” He went on to say that he was fine, “although pretty tired through lack of sleep.” A fellow soldier in a different battery said in a letter sent to his mother and dated April 8, 1918, that “the three Rhode Island batteries are billeted in a huge stone monastery built in 1104, set way down in the corner of an angle formed by three high and sharp hills – which accounts for it still standing.” He added that “this is a tough front, and I will be glad when they see fit to pull us out and send us back for a rest, even though they are getting us gradually back into shape.” (Pawtucket Times, May 11, 1918)

A fine account of Phillips’ unit WWI experience is available in the book by Frederick Ambrose McKenna titled Battery A, 103rd Field Artillery, in France, available to read online at Open Library. There are photos in which Phillips is bound to appear, but then none of the men in the photos are identified by name.

As a Private First Class, he returned to the United States on April 10, 1919, aboard the MONGOLIA, which docked at Commonwealth pier in Boston (Pawtucket Times, April 11, 1918). He then boarded a train to Camp Devens, where the Battery was demobilized on April 29, 1919.

Joseph Quinton. The Summary of Casualties to Date posted in the Times on December 18, 1918, listed him as being among those whose degree of wound was undetermined .

Philibert Riel in WWIHubert Riel. All indications are that the given name “Hubert” on the monument was an error. The serviceman honored was actually Joseph Philibert (aka Albert) Riel. The Times of July 26, 1918, reported that the 301st Engineer Regiment had left Camp Devens on July 12, 1918, for a port of embarkation and had recently landed in France. The history of the Regiment confirms the departure date, and adds that the troops arrived in New York and boarded the Australian coaster KATOOMBA, which left the dock on July 14, 1918. The ship arrived in Liverpool around July 27, 1918. Company F boarded the packet QUEEN ALEXANDRA and landed at Le Havre, France, some two days later.

There appears to be some question as to whether Riel was still with Company F when it sailed to France in July 1918. The listing in Company F, Three Hundred and First Engineers of men who sailed across does not include Private Riel.

As mentioned earlier, an account of the Regiments history can be read in Houghton Mifflin Company’s The Three Hundred and First Engineers: A History, 1917-1919, with illustrations, available to read online at Open Library. A more specific account of Company F’s experience can be read online at the Hathi Trust Digital Library, Company F, Three Hundred and First Engineers.

NOTE:

12th Company and 15th Company went to Dexter Training Grounds, then to Fort Greble.

12th Co. went to Fort Kearney on August 16th.

15th Co. went to Springfield, MA, on August 28th, assigned the duty of guarding the arsenal. The Times reported on January 28, 1918, of a rumor that the 15th Company would soon be transferred to either Fort Getty or Fort Greble to relieve the Companies there. The 15th Company was quarantined in barracks at Springfield for a number of weeks in February and March 1918 due to a measles outbreak; rumors continued of its impending transfer (Pawtucket Times, March 5, 1918). Transfer of the 15th Company to Fort Greble finally occurred in June 1918 (Pawtucket Times, June 13, 1918).

 

SOURCES: Federal censuses of 1910 and 1920; Rhode Island State census of 1915; WWI Draft Registration Cards; U.S., Army Transport Service, Passenger Lists, 1910-1939; Pawtucket Times; Boston Herald; ancestry.com; genealogybank.com; McKenna, Battery A, 103rd Field Artillery, in France; Houghton Mifflin Company, The Three Hundred and First Engineers: A History, 1917-1919, with illustrations.

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One thought on “World War I

  1. Nice job Bob. I have asked my aunt about Philibert serving in the war, she said he was not in long, so I don’t think he was still with the company when they shipped out.

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